Perfect Health for Dogs (and Cats)

If you’re a pet owner, there is information that can allow your pets to be healthy and disease-free for life.  The vet industry would prefer that you not have it, and indeed the educational system that prepares vets for commercial success does not even teach this information. Financial success is only possible for vets because health success is not enjoyed by the vast majority of pets.   As it does in the human medical system, disease makes lots of people lots of money.  For those intrepid thinkers who have decided to not allow themselves to be pawns of this corrupt system, and would like their animals to experience their full health potential as well, full instructions on how to accomplish that are available.  Further, they are cheap and easy to implement. For your pet’s sake, I urge you to avail yourself of this incredibly valuable information by visiting:  www.NoMoreVetBills.com.  

 

Nora and Coco, August 2005

As of this writing in July 2011, Coco is now 18 1/2 years old!  He still trots alongside me when we walk, and has not visited a vet for sickness in 11 years!  This is no accident or fluke of breeding or heredity.  I took positive steps 17 years ago to feed him properly, forego vaccination and “treat” symptoms by removing causes rather than suppressing them with medicines, herbs or supplements.  

It’s always best to start early, but it’s never too late to begin proper feeding.  Your pets will thank you!

 

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Petra Hell October 4, 2011 at 9:25 am

I purchased your e-book and find it quite interesting. One point though when it comes to fasting and your feeding methods – Wolves don’t do agility and are not as active as my dogs would be – between hiking, training and trialling – they are busy. Performance dogs work hard and for the most part, their weight is kept lean.

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Nora October 4, 2011 at 9:42 am

Hi Petra,
Thanks for your valuable feedback! Wolves most certainly DO do agility, that’s where those natural skills that dogs have come from. They are every bit as active as performance dogs, as well. Among domestic dogs, only working dogs might work as hard as wolves do. Nevertheless, if your point is that lean body mass excludes the need for maintenance fasting, I would disagree based on the very low reserves that wolves have historically carried, even through prey scarcity. Even owners of lean performance dogs find that at least one day of fasting per week improves energy and stamina. Regardless of what a dog does as a matter of lifestyle, feeding on alternating days is probably the best of both worlds (domestic and wild). It goes without saying that any kind of symptom requires fasting as well, no matter how active a dog is. Of course lean/skinny dogs rarely get sick.
Thanks again for the input,
Nora

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Rebecca Imel January 3, 2013 at 9:08 pm

Nora, was given your name by a friend who has utmost respect for all that you do. My 13 year-old male cat is experiencing crystals in his urine which was shown to me by a vet, and, obviously I am thinking, in his urinary tract. The vet suggested canned S/D Science Diet, which he will sometimes eat, for he prefers chasing and eating lizards in our yard. (It is Phoenix!) My friend suggested a raw food diet and referred me to your nomorevetbills site; however, there are not specifics on the feeding, ie. the gradual introduction of raw meat into their feeding. Any suggestions/advice? Starting instructions? A book? I would appreciate any feedback. Thank you.

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